Friday, 23 June 2017

New monsters

I found out about Campaign wiki today. I don't even know what I was searching for. Monsters, sure, but I'm not really sure what, because I spent so long being fascinated I forgot what I went for. Good isn't it?

Anyway, I put up a couple of things that I've been thinking about. The Blood Goblin has been in my mind for a very long time, I just like the 'Haemogoblin' joke, and the Poison Dwarf was something I thought of the other day, I don't know why ('The Poison Dwarf' was a nickname given to a character in the TV show Dallas back in the 1980s, why it should pop into my head a few days ago, I cannot really explain). The Glue-vine is also based on a joke of course, this time one I was preparing for John M Stater's great (but sadly abortive) Strange New World. I had a bunch of stuff that I was working on but it never came to much. Shame really, I liked the idea of collaborative planet-building very much.

Here goes anyway, 3 new(-ish) monsters, or maybe just my idiosyncratic take on some common enough ideas.

I hope I've got the stats about right (I don't really understand ascending AC or or challenge ratings by the way, so I might be slightly out on those).


Blood Goblin

Blood Goblins (or Haemogoblins) are pale vampiric Goblins that live with other Goblins, especially underground. Whether they are a separate race, the mutant offspring of regular Goblins, or under a terrible curse, is unknown. If the Maze Master wishes, up to 1-in-6 regular goblins may be replaced by Blood Goblins. Blood Goblins have a -1 penalty to fighting in full daylight and use neither missile weapons nor blunt weapons. They prefer melee and will only use slashing weapons, or their own claws and teeth. If a Blood Goblin wounds an enemy, the wounded enemy will continue to slowly bleed and lose 1hp/round until healing takes place. This is because Blood Goblin saliva (regularly applied to weapons and claws by licking) prevents blood clotting. Furthermore, if it is still alive, the Blood Goblin will be able to track that enemy (at normal movement) until it is healed.

AC 5(14), HD1-1, ATT 2 claws/1 bite/weapon DAM 2d4/1d6/by weapon MV 90’(30’) NM ML7



Poison Dwarf

Poison Dwarves (or Dwarfs) are a chaotic race of Dwarves generally found far underground in small groups of 3d6, or in the castles of Fire Giants, where they sometimes work as weaponsmiths and armourers, at which they excel. Their metal armour always counts as 1AC point lower (higher) than is usual for its class (eg, chain counts as chain-and-shield, plate counts as plate-and-shield etc). Their skin is a mudlike colour, generally a glistening greyish brown. Like many Dwarves, they favour smashing weapons in combat, especially maces and warhammers. They are very strong and have +1 damage. If a Poison Dwarf wounds an opponent in melee, there is a 1-in-6 chance that the opponent will need to make a save v Poison (failure means immediate collapse followed by death in 2d6 rounds, success means all actions at -2 for 6d6 turns). If the corpse of a Poison Dwarf is looted (for example, to retrieve the superior armour) then unless the player states the PC is taking precautions such as wearing gloves the PC will have to save v Poison for the same penalties.  Poison Dwarves are immune to all poisons, and only take ½ damage from fire-based attacks.

AC 4(15), HD1+1, ATT 1 weapon DAM by weapon MV 90’(30’) D1 ML9



Glue-vine

A glue-vine is a large carnivorous plant found in hot swampy, forested and jungle conditions, consisting of a central bulb and a number of sticky barbed tendrils. It will have d4 tendrils for each HD it has, up to 4HD, which can spread up to 20’ from the central bulb. These tendrils can be seen (same chance as for secret doors) if PCs are searching the area. Otherwise, when one or more PCs enter the area, the glue-vine surprises on 1-4 (on a d6). The tendrils are barbed, strong and constrictive, pulling the prey back towards the central bulb. Any PCs hit by a tendril must save v paralysis or be dragged into the centre of the plant where they will be digested over d6 hours (take d20 acid damage per hour or part thereof). PCs cannot fight the glue-vine from the inside due to paralysis, they must be rescued from without. Attacking the glue-vine with fire will also deal ½ damage to the plant and ½ to anyone trapped inside. Cutting off all the tendrils will result in the glue-vine closing itself up completely and squirting a paralysing sap over itself; anyone in contact with the glue-vine (attempting to rescue a comrade from inside, hitting the central bulb in melee) must save v paralysis or be stuck. The glue-vine will then slowly grow new tendrils at the rate of 1’ per day. Though they do not collect treasure as such, killing a glue-vine will undoubtedly reveal the possessions of its victims, which may include coins, gems and magic items (more for larger, older plants with greater HD).


AC 2(17) (bulb) 5(14) tendrils: HD1 to 4 (tendrils have d4 hp each), ATT d4 per HD DAM paralysis + d20 per hour MV0 but can reach up to 20’ ML12




For completeness, here's the 'Glue Vine' write-up (not exactly identical, in the 24th century, hyphens are old hat) that I originally planned to send to John:



Glue Vine (radix glutinosa Keplerii-Szermankovai): this is a large plant which derives nourishment from entrapping and dissolving prey. The plant has a central bole between 1-3 metres across and numerous roots that burrow beneath the surface. These are of two types; there are tough, short ‘anchor roots’ which hold the plant stable, and long ‘vines’, the tips of which project about 0.5 metres above the soil, at a distance of 2-5 metres from the body of the plant. These roots produce an extremely sticky (70+ on the Buchanan Scale) sap that gives the plant its name. When prey – typically for this plant a small herd herbivore known as a Swamp Pig – wanders into the root-zone, it can become stuck to the roots. The plant then begins to contract its root, dragging the animal slowly within the main body, where it is dissolved by the virulent digestive chemicals in the plant’s inner core.


Thursday, 22 June 2017

Should really have put this at the beginning of the Moldvay stuff...

I have, of course, been trying to stock more of Silvergate. Whether this will also impinge on the Abyssal realms I don't know (though by the way I've got hold of some lovely material from I'll See It When I Believe It which I will be definitely incorporating all over the place, including the Abyssal Realms).

So, as it says in the title, this is probably what I should have put first in the posts about Moldvay. But, because I'm an idiot, I didn't, and I've had to go back looking for this. It's a corridor-generator from The Nine and Thirty Kingdoms - it's what I used to give me some content that I could build a section of dungeon from. I did what it suggested and used four letter-shapes (but I didn't bother to do anything fancy about rotating or flipping them, I just decided to 'not make them look like letters'). No proper map I'm afraid, as I have to preserve some mystery, but I did a schematic. The original shapes for my corridors are

... which is 'OSR' and the randomly generated letter '(lower case) g'. So now it stands for OSR gaming, or maybe OSR gangster. As per the directions for how to turn this into corridors, I mushed the letter-shapes together so they were all joined up and began treating them as per the instructions.

However, when I applied the rules for what happens on a corridor, as I hadn't established a scale, I guessed where 'every 60 feet' might be, to roll for doors and stairs and whatnot.

I ended up with 34 rooms, of which maybe 3 are really just broom-cupboards or hidden niches. I'm calling it '34 including 10a' anyway.

Another problem (after guessing scale) was that I didn't have anything to say what was on the other side of the door, at the end of the corridor, etc. The post on The Nine and Thirty Kingdoms says "I am assuming here that you are using tables borrowed from Appendix A or another random dungeon generator to roll for size and shape of rooms, type of door, what's behind each door, or other details as needed."

Well, no, unfortunately, I don't have any such table to hand, Moldvay doesn't include one. Going to have to do something about that, I really need dungeon-dressing tables. But I muddled through, mostly by just filling up some of the space on my map with pseudo-random shapes derived from Paint - circles, a star in one place, a couple of pentagons and hexagons, rectangles with square or rounded corners. Sometimes when it looked like two corridors might join, I joined them, sometimes I imposed rooms (joined or not).

One thing that seemed to make sense but that I have probably never done before - never, even though some such thing is heavily implied in Keep on the Borderlands, and therefore might be considered a 'standard' design feature for those of us of the Moldvay era - is the placing of a room at the end of a 'blocked' corridor. (I actually applied this solution twice, but ended up deleting one because I thought two in a area of less than 36 rooms was overusing the idea). There is a whole bunch of semi-ruined portions of this (sub-)level, but one of the ruined corridors leads to a room that is not accessible by any other means. Sneaky, huh? They'll just have to have a Potion of Gaseous Form or something. Not sure how they get the treasure out though...









Saturday, 17 June 2017

Last Moldvay stocking table for the moment

There are other ways to slice this baby however.

The dividing line between Trap, No treasure and Special, Treasure is at 50%, and I tend to assume the probability on a d6 in percentage terms goes:

1 - 17% (17%)
2 - 16% (33%)
3 - 17% (50%)
4 - 17% (67%)
5 - 16% (83%)
6 - 17% (100%)

My reason is, if you're rounding up or down, 16.6 recurring is closer to 17 than 16, but 33.3 recurring is closer to 33 than 34. So you get tiny adjustments as you go - 1 adds a tiny bit, 2 loses a tiny bit, 3 and 4 add tiny bits again, 5 loses and 6 has what's left.

It gets really gritty when you start taking sixths of sixths and calculating percentages. But guestimating can produce something not too clunky that's still workable (basically, my smallest unit is 6%, approximating a 2/36 chance such as Empty, Treasure)

So the table could look more like this:

Chart 3b

01-17                      Monster; Treasure
18-33                      Monster; No treasure
34-39                     Trap; Treasure 
40-50                     Trap; No treasure
51-56                     Special; Treasure 
57-67                     Special; No treasure
68-73                     Empty; Treasure
74-100                   Empty; No treasure


Compared to the other table it gives a slightly larger chance of getting an 'Empty, No treasure' result but a slightly smaller chance of getting a 'Monster, No treasure'.  That was one of the things that I noted in the original table of course - I deliberately shaved the 'Empty, No treasure' chance as it was a) the largest single group and b) inherently the least interesting.

The other way I thought of to do it was to say that each of the original 36 entries had a base 3% chance of happening. This of course produces a table with 108% on it, so like the occasional addition of 16 instead of 17, 8 of the 3%s need to to be 2%s instead. This will give us 100% again. Like trying to map 16s and 17s onto 16.6 recurring, I'm trying to map 3s and some 2s onto 2.7 recurring. I'm still keeping the same 17/16/17/17/16/17 format, so essentially I need to have five 3s and one 2 to get to 17, four 3s and two 2s to get to 16.

I'm happy that my jumps are 3, 6, 8, 11, 14, 17 (this is a whole d6); 19, 22, 25, 28, 31, 33 (another die), 36, 39, 42, 44, 47, 50 (third die, we're halfway there!) and I suspect I can just replicate that line with 50 added to it - 53, 56, 58, 61, 64, 67 (die 4); 69, 72, 75, 78, 81, 83 (die 5), 86, 89, 92, 94, 97, 100 (die 6). I did check this afterwards and it's right (I prepared an excel spreadsheet to multiply 2.7777777 by 1-36, then list the result as whole numbers, then calculated the difference between the previous number and the next step, so it now looks like this: yellow marks a new die, magenta is a 2, but of course sometimes a 2 is a new die; they're just magenta).

3              3
6              3
8              2
11           3
14           3
17           3
19           2
22           3
25           3
28           3
31           3
33           2
36           3
39           3
42           3
44           2
47           3
50           3
53           3
56           3
58           2
61           3
64           3
67           3
69           2
72           3
75           3
78           3
81           3
83           2
86           3
89           3
92           3
94           2
97           3
100         3

We know where the steps are here (though I'm collapsing the choices of '1 - Monster, 1-3 - Treasure', '1 - Monster, 4-6 - No treasure', '2 - Monster, 1-3 - Treasure', '2 - Monster, 4-6 - No treasure', down to what is in effect (because actually, Moldvay does it) '1 - Monster, Treasure', '2 - Monster, No treasure'.

The first parts (up to 33% probability) look the same - 17% probability of 'Monster, Treasure', 16% probability of 'Monster, No treasure'.

The next part, up to 50% dealing with Traps, have 2/6 determinations with treasure and 4/6 without. They also look the same.

Specials (with or without treasure) take up to 67% - again you could bundle them together if you don't accept the logic of the Trap/Special analogue. Otherwise, they go the same as I have them above (and below).

The last 5/6 is the 'Empty' set from 68% - in this case, 'Empty, Treasure' changes from 73 to 72 and 'Empty, No treasure' increases from 74-100 to 73-100. That's the only change between the two tables.

Mathematically, this is the closest to the original.


Chart 3c

01-17                      Monster; Treasure
18-33                      Monster; No treasure
34-39                     Trap; Treasure 
40-50                     Trap; No treasure
51-56                     Special; Treasure 
57-67                     Special; No treasure
68-72                     Empty; Treasure
73-100                   Empty; No treasure


Is it easier? I'm not sure. It's shorter, because it's a single table and has fewer entries. It seems like it's simpler, but it still involves rolling 2 dice (because with dice, two d10s is still the easiest way to get a percentage I think). If you're using an electronic generator then it's much easier to get a single d100 result and consult one table than a d6 result and consult a table then another d6 result and consult another table. I tend to work that way - dice at the table for sure, but when I'm sitting around fiddling with world-building I'm happy with numbers spewing out of my screen.

Anyway, for the benefit of whoever might want to use it, please accept any of my 3 percentage-based variants on Moldvay's room-stocking table.

And I think I'm done with it for a little while.

Except for using it of course... I'll get back to that soon.

Tuesday, 13 June 2017

More Moldvay

It was where I started, though as I may have mentioned before, I was in the weird position of having the Moldvay Basic and Mentzer Expert sets, which was fine except in a few rather trivial cases. It made organisation a bit difficult at times but never mind.

Anyway, looking again at the Moldvay B52 dungeon-stocking table, I wonder if it might be simplified a little? OK not everyone loves percentage dice, but I'm pretty sure the dungeon-stocking table could be turned into a single roll.

Before I go on though, I should probably explain something that seems really obvious to me but other people don't seem to 'read' into the table. Where Moldvay has his original chart resembling this:

Roll for Monster/Trap/Special:

1-2          Monster
3             Trap
4             Special
5-6          Empty

and then roll for treasure on a matrix:

Roll         Monster              Trap       Empty
1              Yes                      Yes         Yes
2              Yes                      Yes         No
3              Yes                      No          No
4-6          No                        No          No

... it seems obvious to me that that chart is grouped '1-2 - Monster', '3-4 - Trap/Special (50% chance of each)', '5-6 - Empty'. This has one very important consequence: I've always assumed that in the second part where the 'Treasure' roll is made for 'Trap' rooms, it should be read as 'Trap/Special'. I have no actual evidence for that - just both logic and elegance. It fits better if there aren't categories you're generating in the first part that don't apply to the second part, and it's neater if the 'spare' 1/6 category is grouped with the other 1/6 category, rather than one of the others, which are both 2/6. But there is no actual precedent for regarding a 'Special' room as being analogous to a 'Trap' room as far as I know. If you don't want to do things that way, then the data will look slightly different. 'Special' rooms, with no other determinant, will be a 1/6 category on its own.

Anyway, that aside, at present the table produces 36 possible outcomes, which I think look like this:


Chart 1

First roll            Second roll                         No. occurrences               Approx %
1.                              1 – Monster;      1 – Treasure                       1
2.                              1 – Monster;      2 – Treasure                       2
3.                              1 – Monster;      3 – Treasure                       3
4.                              1 – Monster;      4 – No treasure                  1
5.                              1 – Monster;      5 – No treasure                  2
6.                              1 – Monster;      6 – No treasure                  3
7.                              2 – Monster;      1 – Treasure                       4
8.                              2 – Monster;      2 – Treasure                       5
9.                              2 – Monster;      3 – Treasure                       6                                         17
10.                          2 – Monster;      4 – No treasure                  4
11.                          2 – Monster;      5 – No treasure                  5
12.                          2 – Monster;      6 – No treasure                  6                                          17
13.                          3 –Trap;             1 – Treasure                       1
14.                          3 –Trap;             2 – Treasure                       2                                           6
15.                          3 –Trap;             3 – No treasure                  1
16.                          3 –Trap;             4 – No treasure                  2
17.                         3 –Trap;             5 – No treasure                   3
18.                         3 –Trap;             6 – No treasure                   4                                         11
19.                         4 – Special;        1 – Treasure                        1
20.                         4 – Special;        2 – Treasure                        2                                           6
21.                         4 – Special;        3 – No treasure                   1
22.                         4 – Special;        4 – No treasure                   2
23.                         4 – Special;        5 – No treasure                   3
24.                         4 – Special;        6 – No treasure                   4                                         11
25.                         5 – Empty;         1 – Treasure                        1
26.                         5 – Empty;         2 – No treasure                   1
27.                         5 – Empty;         3 – No treasure                   2
28.                         5 – Empty;         4 – No treasure                   3
29.                         5 – Empty;         5 – No treasure                   4
30.                         5 – Empty;         6 – No treasure                   5
31.                         6 – Empty;         1 – Treasure                        2                                           6
32.                        6 – Empty;          2 – No Treasure                  6
33.                        6 – Empty;          3 – No treasure                   7
34.                        6 – Empty;          4 – No treasure                   8
35.                        6 – Empty;          5 – No treasure                   9
36.                        6 – Empty;          6 – No treasure                 10                                         28


A colourised version which might be easier to understand looks something like this:



Chart 1a

First roll              Second roll                        No. occurrences           Approx %
1.                               1 – Monster;       1 – Treasure                       1
2.                               1 – Monster;       2 – Treasure                       2
3.                               1 – Monster;       3 – Treasure                       3
4.                               1 – Monster;       4 – No treasure                  1
5.                               1 – Monster;       5 – No treasure                  2
6.                               1 – Monster;       6 – No treasure                  3
7.                               2 – Monster;       1 – Treasure                       4
8.                               2 – Monster;       2 – Treasure                       5
9.                               2 – Monster;       3 – Treasure                       6                                    17
10.               2 – Monster;       4 – No treasure                  4
11.                           2 – Monster;       5 – No treasure                  5
12.               2 – Monster;       6 – No treasure                  6                                     17
13.               3 –Trap;              1 – Treasure                       1
14.               3 –Trap;              2 – Treasure                       2                                       6
15.                           3 –Trap;              3 – No treasure                  1
16.                           3 –Trap;              4 – No treasure                  2
17.                           3 –Trap;              5 – No treasure                  3
18            .   3 –Trap;              6 – No treasure                  4                                      11
19.                           4 – Special;         1 – Treasure                       1
20.                           4 – Special;         2 – Treasure                       2                                       6
21.                           4 – Special;         3 – No treasure                   1
22.                           4 – Special;         4 – No treasure                   2
23.                           4 – Special;         5 – No treasure                   3
24.                           4 – Special;         6 – No treasure                   4                                    11
25.                           5 – Empty;          1 – Treasure                        1
26.                           5 – Empty;          2 – No treasure                   1
27.                           5 – Empty;          3 – No treasure                   2
28.                           5 – Empty;          4 – No treasure                   3
29.                           5 – Empty;          5 – No treasure                   4
30.                           5 – Empty;          6 – No treasure                   5
31.                          6 – Empty;           1 – Treasure                       2                                      6
32.                          6 – Empty;           2 – No treasure                  6
33.                          6 – Empty;           3 – No treasure                  7
34.                          6 – Empty;           4 – No treasure                  8
35.                          6 – Empty;           5 – No treasure                  9
36.                          6 – Empty;           6 – No treasure                10                                     28


We can see that there are in fact only 8 different possibilities, which have a chance of occurring somewhere between 6% and 28% (my rough figures actually add up to 102, but I'm prepared to call that 'within engineering tolerances'). Getting rid of the unnecessary data (the 28 entries that are repeated) makes the chart looks this:


Chart 2

First roll              Second roll                    No.                 Approx %           Σ %
                                                                   occurrences
1-2 – Monster;    1-3 – Treasure                6                     17                       17
1-2 – Monster;    4-6 – No treasure           6                     17                       34
3 –Trap;              1-2 – Treasure                2                       6                       40
3 –Trap;              3-6 – No treasure           4                      11                      51
4 – Special;         1-2 – Treasure                2                       6                       57
4 – Special;         3-6 – No treasure           4                      11                       68
5-6 – Empty;       1 – Treasure                   2                        6                      74
5-6 – Empty;       2-6 – No treasure          10                     28                    102


As I'm attempting to turn this into a percentage chart I have to dispose of the 2% margin of error. My instinct is to take it from the largest (and intrinsically least-interesting) category, 'Empty; No Treasure'. The change from 28% to 26% is less significant than most other possible changes (only 2 changes of 17% to 16% would be less significant) but also, rooms coming up 'empty, empty' aren't as interesting as any other category. I don't think dropping the probability from 28% to 26% while fractionally boosting the other percentages is doing violence to the table.

Turning the 8 possibilities into a chart using those percentages looks like this:


Chart 3a

01-17                     Monster; Treasure
18-34                     Monster; No treasure
35-40                     Trap; Treasure 
41-51                     Trap; No treasure
52-57                     Special; Treasure 
58-68                     Special; No treasure
69-74                     Empty; Treasure
75-100                   Empty; No treasure



And that is it - the essence of the Moldvay room-stocking charts in one handy block.

Unless I've done something stupid with the maths or reading the chart... and I guess given the caveat above about my reading of 'Trap/Special', you could just read "52-57  Special; Treasure ... 58-68  Special; No treasure" as "52-68 Special (DM's choice)". But I prefer my way.



Did I mention, I really hate how Blogger formats things...?


Sunday, 11 June 2017

Time well-spent and time wasted - the Moldvay Dungeon-stocking tables

I could have just gone and found my copy of Moldvay. That's what I'm after, particularly, page B52, the dungeon-stoking tables and advice. But, instead, I'm on the net with about 11 tabs open looking at the Nine and Thirty Kingdoms, the Society of the Torch, Pole and Rope, Ode to Black Dougal, Dungeon Fantastic, and the Lands of Ara. As well as google text and image pages and a page for downloading the non-art version of Labyrinth Lord. All of which is great of course, they're some fantastic blogs with loads of interesting insights into how and why we game and what makes it interesting/fun/easier/more unexpected, but...

I actually just looked for my copy of Moldvay. It took me less than a minute to find it, and now I'm going to do what I was going to do more than hour ago - start the bloody room-stocking!

This is the gist of what I was after - now formatted with numbers in case I want to randomly determine traps or whatever, and more generally put into the way I tend to note things... (pity Blogger doesn't like Word formatting but hey-ho).

Moldvay Basic (B52) 

This is a two-step process:

1-2        Monster
3          Trap
4          Special
5-6        Empty

and then roll for treasure on a matrix:

Roll      Monster            Trap      Empty
1          Yes                   Yes      Yes
2          Yes                   Yes      No
3          Yes                   No        No
4-6        No                    No        No


Room Traps:
1.     Poison Gas: save v poison or die
2.     Fog: looks like poison gas, but harmless
3.     Pit: 1d6 DAM /10’ fallen
4.     Ceiling block falls: Save v Turn to Stone or take d10pts DAM
5.     Pendulum blade from ceiling: d8pts DAM
6.     Chute: no DAM, slide to next level down

Treasure Traps:
1.     Poison needle: save v poison or die
2.     Spring-fired darts: d6 darts for d4 DAM each
3.     Flash of Light: save v spells or be blinded for d8 turns
4.     Poison snake: see SNAKE in monster descriptions
5.     Spray: sprayed with an unknown liquid that attracts Wandering Monsters; double chance for d6 hours
6.     Illusion: anything, often a monster (as Phantasmal Force)
           
Specials
1.     Moaning room or corridor
2.     Room turns or sinks while the door locks
3.     Illusionary stairs or corridor
4.     Shifting blocks to close off corridor
5.     Trap door to tunnels
6.     Alarm that summons special monster
7.     Taking statue
8.     Magic pool whose waters have strange effect
9.     Magic gate to another part of the dungeon
10.  Flying weapons which attack only if disturbed

Unguarded treasures
Dungeon Level              Silver pieces*    Gold Pieces      Gems   Jewellery          Magic Items
1                                  d6x100             50%                  5%       2%                   2%
                                                            d6x10               d6        d6                    Any 1
2-3                                d12x100           50%                 10%     5%                   8%
                                                            d6x100             d6        d6                    Any 1


*Note that SP will always be found in unguarded treasure, and other items are given in terms of the die rolled to determine the number present


... and that's it, Part 8, E (Stocking the Dungeon). Only took me marginally longer to type than to find, though I had copied the first part of the table from this post at Dungeon Fantastic so thanks for that.

EDIT: Oh, I am a silly sausage... here are the room determinations...


Determinations (Rooms 1-33, including 10a):

1.     3,4 – Trap, no treasure
2.     6,6 – Empty, no treasure
3.     4,2 – Special, treasure
4.     1,2 – Monster, treasure
5.     1,4 – Monster, no treasure
6.     4,1 – Special, treasure
7.     6,3 – Empty, no treasure
8.     1,6 – Monster, no treasure
9.     5,1 – Empty, treasure
10.  2,3 – Monster, treasure
11.  6,4 – Empty, no treasure
12.  3,5 – Monster, no treasure
13.  6,6 – Empty, no treasure
14.  6,6 – Empty, no treasure
15.  2,6 – Monster, no treasure
16.  4,6 – Special, no treasure
17.  4,6 – Special, no treasure
18.  4,3 – Special, no treasure
19.  3,3 – Trap, treasure
20.  2,2 – Monster, treasure
21.  2,1 – Monster, treasure
22.  2,2 – Monster, treasure
23.  5,3 – Empty, no treasure
24.  6,6 – Empty, no treasure
25.  6,4 – Empty, no treasure
26.  1,3 – Monster, treasure
27.  5,3 – Empty, no treasure
28.  3,6 – Trap, no treasure
29.  5,6 – Empty, no treasure
30.  5,2 – Empty, no treasure
31.  3,5 – Monster, no treasure
32.  6,2 – Empty, no treasure
33.  5,2 – Empty, no treasure
34.  6,6 – Empty, no treasure








Nope, no matter what I do I can't get it to format properly. Never mind, it still makes sense.